Sexually Transmitted Infections (STI), HIV 

HIV is the most fatal STI and remains a major public health threat despite enormous progress in controlling the epidemic and saving lives in the past 15 years. Medicines to threat HIV/AIDS have changed the course of the epidemic. These medicines decrease the viral load of infected people, allowing them to live longer and reducing the risk of further transmission. Despite of the progress, there are still too many people living with HIV and other STI.  

 

  • According to the UNAIDS Sub-Saharan Africa remains the epicentre of the global AIDS pandemic, accounting for 64 % of new HIV infections and 73 % of AIDS-related deaths in 2016. 

  • In 2014 UNAIDS reported that sex workers were 10-times more likely to acquire HIV than adults in the general population; men who have sex with men were 24-times more likely to acquire HIV; and transgender people were 49-times more likely to be living with HIV. 

  • Young women aged 15-24 years are also at the high risk of HIVinfection. They accounted for 26 % of new adult infections globally in 2015, despite accounting only 10 % of the adult population (UNAIDS 2015). 

STIs other than HIV receive little attencion in health policies and services despite contributing greatly to the sexual and reproductive health disease burden worldwide. WHO estimates that more than 1 million STIs are acquired every day worldwide. A paucity in knowledge combined with the persistent social stigma surrounding STIs prevents many people from seeking and receiving counselling, testing and treatment. Criminalisation and stigmatisation of same-sex relationships and sex work make access to HIV prevetnion services more difficult.To be effective, prevention of HIV and other STIs must focus on population subgroups with high proportions of infected people and people with the multiple partners, while also making information and services available to the general population. 

 

Read more: 

 

Miles to Go: Closing Gaps Breaking Barriers Righting Injustice (UNAIDS 2018)

 

Consolidated guidelines on HIV prevention, diagnosis, treatment and care for key populations (WHO, 2016)

 

HIV and young men who have sex with men (WHO, 2015)

 

Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS, 2017)